27
Jul

Travel and Safety for Your Pet

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

Summer and road trips go hand-in-hand for many families, including those who own a dog. When it comes to traveling with pets, advanced planning can mean the difference between fond memories and a ruined trip. If you know you’ll be hitting the road with your dog in tow, allow for as much time as possible to plan the logistics. This starts with a call or visit to Buffalo Trace Veterinary Clinic to make sure your pet’s vaccinations are current. It’s also a good idea to schedule a check-up if your dog hasn’t had one in the last year.

To avoid coming home without your dog, make sure that she has a collar and tags as well as a microchip with updated contact information. Dogs like routine and may try to escape an unfamiliar environment. Without identification, it’s unlikely you will find your pet so far from home.

Packing a Bag for the Dog

While you’re packing a suitcase for yourself or your children, don’t forget to pack a separate bag for the dog. Even if you’re trying to pack light, keep in mind it’s better to have the things you need with you than having to try to buy them in an unfamiliar area. At a minimum, your dog’s travel bag should include:

● Food and water bowls

● His regular brand of dog food

● Flea and tick repellant

● Any medications he takes

● Pooper scooper and disposable bags

● Brush, shampoo, and his own towels

● Dog leash

● His favorite toys

● Dog treats

● Canine insect repellant and sunscreen

Staying Safe on the Road

Having a passenger hold the dog on his or her lap can compromise safety for the driver. It’s best for everyone, the dog included, to place him in a crate or seatbelt. You know your dog’s personality best and what he can tolerate. When you make stops, one person should remain in the car with the dog at all times. This is especially important on days with a high heat and humidity index. An unsupervised dog in a hot car is just a tragedy waiting to happen.

Rest Stops and Breaks

Your dog needs the opportunity to relieve herself at least once every four hours. She also needs to exercise to make up for long periods of inactivity in the car. If you’re unable to locate dog parks on your route, you can stop at a highway rest stop. Just make sure that you follow good etiquette by keeping your dog on a leash and cleaning up after her. When you can’t let her go off-leash, look for a groomed trail to walk her on before resuming your road trip.

Pet-Friendly Accommodations

If you’re staying in a hotel or another public location, make sure it accepts dogs first. You can check the website Dog Friendly just to make sure before leaving on vacation. Once you have checked in, plan to keep your dog with you or board him if you’re attending a people-only event. A dog left alone in a strange hotel room is likely to bark and cause a disturbance to other guests. You could be asked to leave if enough people complain. Fortunately, you can avoid this by following a few common-sense guidelines and remaining courteous of others at all times.

 

Photo Credit:  humonia | iStock Photo

22
Jul

A Hot Car is No Place for a Dog

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

Dogs love spending time with their owners in the summer, even when it’s just running errands. However, this is one time when it’s best to leave your dog at home. Whether you’re just dropping off paperwork or running into a store, you have no way of knowing if you will be delayed in getting back to your car. By the time you do get back, your dog could be in full heatstroke mode or even deceased. This is true even when you leave the windows partially rolled down.

On a typical 80-degree summer day, the temperature inside your car can reach as high as 120 degrees in 10 minutes. If it’s 90 degrees outside, the interior of your vehicle can get to 160 degrees in the same amount of time. Considering that your dog’s health and life are at stake, leaving her behind in the car while you run errands just isn’t a risk worth taking.

Why Summer’s Heat and Dogs Can Be a Deadly Combination

When you feel too warm, your body starts sweating to help keep you cool and prevent heat exhaustion. This is not true with dogs. Unlike people, they don’t possess the ability to sweat. Panting and releasing heat through the pads of their paws are the only ways dogs have to reduce their body temperature. This system is not nearly as efficient as our own, which explains why so many cases of canine heatstroke end up being fatal.

Signs of Heatstroke in Dogs

If you do make the mistake of leaving your dog in a hot car, it’s important to watch for possible signs of heatstroke. These include:

● Extremely heavy panting

● Thick saliva

● Vomiting

● Diarrhea

● Appearing uncoordinated

● Excessive thirst

● Refusing to eat

● Dark tongue

It’s important to get your dog in for emergency treatment at Buffalo Trace Veterinary Hospital right away if he has even one of these symptoms. If you’re already home and start noticing problems, cool your dog down with wet rags and offer him water on your way to see us. Should you notice another dog in a hot car while you’re out, don’t hesitate to call the police. They have the tools available to break the window and rescue the dog if necessary.

 

Image credit:  Iryna Kazlova | iStock

20
Jun

July 4 Announcement

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

Notice:  We will be closed on July 4th.

However, it is very important to note that many pets experience anxiety with the festivities surrounding the 4th of July.  Many pets become lost, due to fleeing at the sound of the loud booms and crowds of people.  Not to mention, taking your pet to firework events may cause anxiety do to unfamiliar surroundings.

If your pet is one who displays repeated barking, cowering, trembling,  or destructive behaviors during thunderstorms or fireworks, you will want to take precautionary steps prior to the July 4 festivities.  This may include leaving your pet in a safe, comfortable area away from the noise and commotion.  However, even if your pet is left home, he/she may still be able to hear the loud sounds.  Please contact us prior to July 4th, and we can provide tips and perhaps even medication to help alleviate the anxiety your pet is experiencing.  

We wish you and your pets a safe and happy holiday!

 

Image compilation credit:  iStock Photo

 

6
Jun

Spay & Neuter Clinic

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

We are offering a Spay and Neuter Clinic for cats on June 18th!

Buffalo Trace Cat Spay Neuter Clinic 6-4-15

Why is spaying or neutering important for your pet's health?

  • According to an article by USA Today, pets who live in the states with the highest rates of spaying/neutering also live the longest.
  • When your pet is spayed or neutered, it is no longer fighting that internal urge to mate. Therefore, it is less likely to roam and get lost, hit by a car, etc.
  • Another huge health positive of spaying and neutering is the reduced risk of your pet developing cancer. Unspayed animals have a much higher chance of developing uterine cancer or testicular cancer.
  • Pets that are spayed or neutered are also proven to be less aggressive and overall happier, healthier pets.

To schedule this very beneficial surgery for your pet, give us a call today! We would be glad to answer any additional questions that you may have regarding this common procedure.

 

Image credit:  Fly_Dragonfly | Thinkstock.com

8
May

Last Chance Vaccination Clinic!

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

Due to popular request, we are offering another vaccination clinic in May:

Please join us:

Saturday May 16, 9a to 2p.  

This is a critical and lifesaving vaccination.  

Keeping up-to-date with rabies vaccinations is not only the moral thing to do, it's also the law. If your dog or cat is at least three months old, contact us at Buffalo Trace Veterinary Clinic to get him or her on a vaccination schedule.

25
Mar

Rabies. What is it?

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

Rabies is a deadly disease in both animals and humans, though far more dogs, cats, and other pets succumb to it annually than people. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), rabies claims 50,000 human lives and millions of animal lives across the world every year. The main way that animals contract the disease, which primarily affects the brain and spinal cord, is being bitten by another animal. Bats, foxes, raccoons, and skunks are the biggest carriers of rabies. Unvaccinated dogs and cats that are not supervised outdoors have the highest risk of coming into contact with another animal with this disease. They can then spread it to their human owners through saliva or by accidentally scratching them.

Symptoms of Rabies in House Pets:

It may be up to eight weeks before your dog or cat shows symptoms of rabies since it has a long incubation period. The one exception to this is when rabies is spread through saliva and symptoms appear approximately 10 days later. A marked change in behavior is one of the first things that most pet owners notice. A normally mild-tempered dog becomes aggressive or a cat who loved to be next to people suddenly spends most of his or her time in hiding. Later symptoms of rabies include:

  • Hypersensitivity to light, sound, and touch
  • Disorientation, staggering, and lack of coordination
  • Paralysis of the hind legs
  • Loss of appetite
  • Seizures
  • Foaming at the mouth resulting from paralysis of the jaw and throat muscles

Death can occur suddenly or after several months of symptoms, but rabies is always fatal.

Protect Your Pet with a Rabies Vaccination

Keeping up-to-date with rabies vaccinations is not only the moral thing to do, it's also the law. If your dog or cat is at least three months old, contact us at Buffalo Trace Veterinary Clinic to get him or her on a vaccination schedule. For your convenience, we are offering rabies vaccination clinics at the following times:

  • Saturday, April 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, April 16 from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 18 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Image Credit: WilleeCole | Thinkstock.com

15
Mar

Rabies Myths and Facts

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog

Although rabies is much less prevalent today than previous generations, it remains a serious, deadly disease that understandably frightens people. Many myths persist about rabies because of this fear. It's important to separate fact from fiction so you have a realistic understanding of your own risk and that of your pets. Knowing the reality of rabies also helps you make informed decisions about prevention.

MYTH: A pet that is bitten by an infected animal doesn't develop rabies until the infection reaches the brain.
FACT:  Rabies has an incubation period ranging from 10 days to more than two months. The time it takes for the infection to reach the brain, muscle tissues, peripheral nerves, or central nervous system depends on the severity and location of the bite. If an infected animal bites your pet, he or she already has rabies before symptoms appear.

MYTH: The only way to contract rabies is through the bite of an infected animal.
FACT:  Your pet only needs to come into contact with the saliva of an infected animal to be at risk for rabies. It can be transmitted just as easily through a scratch or an open wound when the carrier has saliva on its claws.

MYTH: Rabies is only transmitted by stray dogs in industrialized nations.
FACT: Domesticated pets that are unvaccinated pose the same risk as stray dogs when it comes to spreading rabies.

MYTH: Foaming at the mouth is the only way that owners know their dog has rabies.
FACT:  This is only one late-stage symptoms or rabies. Infected pets may also show significant behavior changes, refuse food, have a seizure, become disoriented, and become paralyzed in the back legs.

MYTH: Rabies vaccinations are painful and have many side effects.
FACT:  A rabies vaccination is over quickly, just like any other preventive shot. Your pet may have mild side effects the day of the injection, such as sleepiness or lethargy. However, this is far preferable to an inevitable death that comes with rabies. Visit Our Rabies Vaccination Clinics in April

Buffalo Trace Veterinary Clinic is pleased to offer the following rabies vaccination clinics to our patients and the public:

  • Saturday, April 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, April 16 from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 18 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Image Credit: adogslifephoto | Thinkstock.com

19
Feb

Spay & Neuter Importance

Written by Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services on . Posted in Blog


Spaying or neutering your pet carries an array of benefits. There are two main benefits, however, that really stick out: curbing pet overpopulation and making your pet healthier. At Buffalo Trace Veterinary, we find both of these benefits to be influential.

Pet overpopulation is a problem for every state in the U.S. According to Humanesociety.org, there are 6-8 million homeless pets entering animal shelters each year. Six to eight million! These pets are almost all healthy, loving, perfectly adoptable pets. Many of these animals end up being euthanized, solely because there is not enough room for them in the animal shelters. By spaying or neutering your pet, you can help reduce the number of animals living without a home.

Why is spaying or neutering important for your pet's health?

  • According to an article by USA Today, pets who live in the states with the highest rates of spaying/neutering also live the longest.
  • When your pet is spayed or neutered, it is no longer fighting that internal urge to mate. Therefore, it is less likely to roam and get lost, hit by a car, etc.
  • Another huge health positive of spaying and neutering is the reduced risk of your pet developing cancer. Unspayed animals have a much higher chance of developing uterine cancer or testicular cancer.
  • Pets that are spayed or neutered are also proven to be less aggressive and overall happier, healthier pets.

To schedule this very beneficial surgery for your pet, give us a call today! We would be glad to answer any additional questions that you may have regarding this common procedure.

 

Image credit:  Fly_Dragonfly | Thinkstock.com

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Buffalo Trace Veterinary Services in Versailles, KY is an outpatient companion animal clinic that emphasizes compassionate and affordable veterinary care for your Pre-Furred family members. It is our commitment to provide quality veterinary care throughout the life of your pet. Our services and facilities are designed to assist in routine preventive care for young, heal

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